Tagged Film

LFF review: Shame

From Netribution: Artist/director Steve McQueen’s second feature (following 2008’s Hunger), follows the unravelling New York existence of sex addict Brandon (Michael Fassbender). Living alone, he (seemingly) happily picks up girls in bars, orders prostitutes like takeout and masturbates in the work loos after watching porn on his computer. It’s a tad compulsive, but his outward charm and ability to just about hold it together is keeping people fooled. Then, his volatile, attention-seeking sister Sissy (Carey Mulligan) turns up to stay in his apartment, and things slowly fall apart.

LFF Preview: An Education

From Netribution An Education, which has its UK premiere tonight at the London Film Festival, is based on a short memoir written by newspaper journalist Lynn Barber, which was published in Granta. The story was adapted for the screen by Nicky Hornby, and stars Carey Mulligan in an acclaimed turn as 16-year-old Jenny (based on the young Lynn), and Peter Sarsgaard as David, the older man who shows her what life is like beyond school and the suburbs.

LFF Preview: Fantastic Mr Fox

From Netribution Wes Anderson’s Fantastic Mr Fox will have its world premiere at the London Film Festival’s opening gala tonight. Suchandrika Chakrabarti reviews.

Behind the scenes: Jackboots on Whitehall

From Netribution Jackboots on Whitehall has been called the “British Team America,” countless times for its use of puppets, but there’s a lot more to the film than that. It gives us an alternative World War II scenario, in which the Nazis managed to invade Britain. The debut writer/directors, brothers Ed (25) and Rory McHenry (22), have managed to entice an impressive array of stars into lending their voices to the film, including Ewan MacGregor, Rosamund Pike and Alan Cumming as a very camp Hitler.

Cinema and History: The Telling of Stories

As the fare currently on offer at this year’s London Film Festival shows, getting history up on the big screen is very much in vogue at the moment. Between Frost/Nixon, The Baader-Meinhof Complex and W., recent events are almost constantly being reappropriated for the screen at the moment.

Frost/Nixon world premiere opens London Film Festival tonight

From Netribution The LFF has chosen well for its opening night. Ahead of the final presidential debate between Barack Obama and John McCain in New York tonight, Frost/Nixon, the tale of a president undone in a television interview, has its world premiere in London tonight. Surely you know the story? The 37th president of the United States was involved in some bad stuff called Watergate (let’s ignore the wars and other things for now) in 1972. After this came to light, Richard Milhous Nixon (Frank Langella) duly resigned in 1974 and went a bit quiet in Florida until 1977. Then,…

London Film Festival preview: Religulous

Fundamentalist atheism is as old as religion, and possibly time. Back in a less liberal era, the 16th century, the playwright Christopher Marlowe got into trouble for trashing religion as a translator of the classical author Ovid (“God is a name, no substance, feared in vain“), as well as in his own stuff (“I count religion but a childish toy“). US comedian Bill Maher shares a lot of Marlowe’s sentiments; he believes “faith means making a virtue out of not thinking.” Religulous is the result of taking that idea to some very religious people and basically bashing them over the…