Tagged review

LFF review: We Need to Talk about Kevin

From Netribution: Warning: spoilers (as far as I can spoil the plot of a very famous 8-year-old book for you) Ah. “We need to talk about Kevin.” The words that the eponymous Kevin (Ezra Miller/Jasper Newell/ Rocky Duer)’s mother Eva (Tilda Swinton) never manages to say to her sweet, blinkered husband Franklin (John C Reilly). Lynne Ramsay‘s fine adaptation of the very unloveable 2003 novel dispenses with the epistolary form of the original, and is instead structured around Eva’s life post-massacre, with flashes of the past forcing continually pushing to the surface. Kevin’s actions have defined her current situation; the…

Cinema and History: The Telling of Stories

As the fare currently on offer at this year’s London Film Festival shows, getting history up on the big screen is very much in vogue at the moment. Between Frost/Nixon, The Baader-Meinhof Complex and W., recent events are almost constantly being reappropriated for the screen at the moment.

London Film Festival preview: Religulous

Fundamentalist atheism is as old as religion, and possibly time. Back in a less liberal era, the 16th century, the playwright Christopher Marlowe got into trouble for trashing religion as a translator of the classical author Ovid (“God is a name, no substance, feared in vain“), as well as in his own stuff (“I count religion but a childish toy“). US comedian Bill Maher shares a lot of Marlowe’s sentiments; he believes “faith means making a virtue out of not thinking.” Religulous is the result of taking that idea to some very religious people and basically bashing them over the…

Adventures in Short Film: Volume 1

Future Shorts, the film label behind Rock’n’ Roll Cinema and Secret Cinema , as well as global distributor of short films, has released its first DVD, a bit of a greatest hits called Adventures in Short Film – Volume 1. They chose well for their inaugural compilation. As with a short story, short films can do great things with a hint of strangeness. It works for Henry James in The Turn of the Screw and John Wyndham in Consider Her Ways (please do click on the links and read them when you can, especially the second one), and it works…

Times and Winds review

From the Film and Festivals print mag: Set in a mountainous Turkish village, Times and Winds (Bes Vakit) looks at a Muslim community defined by the five daily calls to prayer. The stories of three children give the viewer a way in: Omer (Ozkan Ozen), whose father is the subject of his murderous impulses; Yakup (Ali Bey Kayali), whose crush on his schoolteacher is shared by his father; and Yildiz (Elit Iscan), who often has to act as a mother to her small brother.

Somers Town review

From the Film and Festivals print mag: NB: I foolishly didn’t realise this at the time of writing, but the whole thing was funded by Eurostar money. Explains a lot! Director Shane Meadows leaves behind the harsh lessons and 80’s Nottingham setting of This Is England in his new effort, Somers Town. It is a much gentler tale of growing up, set in modern-day London.